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Join Team Bili at the 2014 Asics LA Marathon!

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The Bili Project Foundation will be a ‘Participating Charity’ in the 2014 ASICS LA Marathon! Be a part of the inaugural group to run for one of the best foundations in one of the best marathons in the country.

Interested in being a part of Team Bili? Space is limited, sign up now.

If you would like to run for Team Bili or be a sponsor contact msearle@rrcsinc.com for more information.

 OH, BY THE WAY, WE ALSO LINED UP SOME COOL TEAM PERKS!

  • Raise $1,000 and your registration fee is waived plus receive The Bili Project ASICS LA Marathon Team Shirt
  • Special recognition for those who raise above $1,500
  • Small group training to help you achieve your race goals
  • Access to a private Facebook group to share ideas, coordinate training and make new friends
  • Training and fundraising support, including newsletters with important race updates and training tips
  • Inclusion in our video – 26.2 miles – video captures the journey of our runners
  • Our amazing cheer team will inspire you along the course

REGISTRATION FEES

  • $150 per person
  • Refunded race registration fee when $1,000 in fundraising goal is met
  • Includes: Training Support, Marathon Entry Fee, Team Shirt and other perks

If you would like to run for Team Bili or be a sponsor contact msearle@rrcsinc.com for more information..

Progress Update!

A Reason to Affirm Your ‘Bilief’ in the Bili Project Foundation

Progress Update

09.19.13

Dear Bilievers,

We have made significant headway in terms of establishing the UCSF Hepatobiliary Tissue Bank (HBTB), forging partnerships with world-renowned institutions to expand our work, conducting innovative research, and leveraging contributions toward efforts that have helped the tumor bank grow.

A summary of these accomplishments is detailed below.

All-Star UCSF Research Team

research_actionOur GI Oncology laboratory includes an interdisciplinary team of world-class surgeons, clinicians, and basic and translational researchers who work closely with other specialists.

Funds from the Bili Project Foundation continue to support the endeavors of talented faculty members, including Robin K. (“Katie”) Kelley, MD, a gastrointestinal oncologist who treats liver cancers such as hepatocellular carcinoma and Robert Kerlan, MD, who is the chief of Interventional Radiology at UCSF Medical Center and is particularly interested in the management of liver disease.

Others Are Taking Notice

paparazziIn the past year, we have published our findings in journals including Annals of Oncology, Chromatographia, and Journal of Clinical Oncology, and work associated with the UCSF HBTB has been presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in June 2013, the UCSF Liver Center Annual Symposium in April 2013, the UCSF Hematology/Oncology Division Research Retreat in February 2013, the Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in January 2013, and the Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology in March 2013.

Team Expansion

growthWe have expanded our team and magnitude of work. In September 2012, we added Ryan McWhirter as a clinical research coordinator and he has been instrumental in developing the UCSF HBTB. Ryan also has coordinated specimen collection, banking, and data management for an ongoing serum micro-RNA project and a completed circulating tumor cell project.

We have also established a year-long research project for Anna Parks, a fourth-year UCSF medical student, who will be working with Ryan, entering data for the HBTB and writing a case series for publication. Building upon Anna’s experience, we hope to design a recurring educational component to the UCSF HBTB by selecting a new medical student each spring for a one-year research experience, which would involve writing a case study and participating in ongoing HBTB projects.

UCSF Hepatobiliary Tissue Bank Growing

researcherWe now have both the clinical data and specimens of blood or tumor tissue from more than 50 patients stored at the bank. One of our ongoing infrastructure projects, which will improve the functioning of the HBTB, includes the migration of the current Tissue Core database to the Cancer Center’s OnCore Clinical Trial Database. Dr. Kelley is also working closely with Dr. Susan Logan, a surgical colleague at UCSF­ Fresno, to open this banking mechanism to UCSF-Fresno along with other University of California sites which will significantly increase specimen collection and expand the scope and impact of future research using HBTB specimens

Collaborations and Development of Secondary HBTB Projects

thnkingUCSF has been approved as a site for the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project which, owing in part to the commitment of specimens from the UCSF HBTB, is expected to be expanded to include a cholangiocarcinoma project. In addition to our participation in TCGA, other collaborative and multicenter research efforts building upon the UCSF HBTB, include:

 

  • Biliary tract cancer genomics studies, the Bardeesy Lab, Harvard Medical School
  • Genome-wide association study (GWAS) in hepatocellular carcinoma, MD Anderson Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • GWAS in biliary tract cancers, the Mayo Clinic
  • International Hepatobiliary Cancer Registry, the Mayo Clinic
  • Proteomics of hepatobiliary cancers, the Shokat Lab, UCSF Mission Bay Campus
 The Future is Promising

groupOur ground-breaking projects have captured the attention of other institutions and UCSF has begun partnering with Harvard Medical School, MD Anderson, and the Mayo Clinic on the study of hepatobiliary cancers.

Bilievers, we appreciate your support and dedication and look forward to all that we will accomplish together.  To affirm your bilief, SHARE this message. Donate here..

California’s First Hepatobiliary Cancer Tissue Bank Opens at UCSF Medical Center

California’s First Hepatobiliary Cancer Tissue Bank Opens at UCSF Medical Center

Begins Operations Six Months Ahead of Schedule

Key Element for Enhancing Diagnosis, Treatment of Third Leading Cause of Cancer Deaths

 

California’s first hepatobiliary cancer tissue bank has begun full-scale operations at the UCSF Medical Center in San Francisco.  The bank is the cornerstone of The Bili Project Foundation’s ongoing work to reduce the incidence and improve the treatment outcomes promoting research to identify hepatobiliary cancer diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets.   The Foundation also announced that it has secured a grant from The Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation to support ongoing and expanded research in biliary tract cancers, the third leading cause of cancer death globally.

 

“We are gratified both by having the bank online ahead of schedule and by the fact that more than 50 patients have already provided clinical data along with blood and tissue specimens,” commented Joy Stephenson.  “This work will soon be expanded to include specimen from UCSF Fresno as well as the inclusion of data in the OnCore Clinical Trials Database to encourage and facilitate the collaboration of researchers from around the world.”

 

The longitudinal, annotated hepatobiliary cancer tissue bank is being led by an all-star medical team that includes Alan P. Venook, MD, a nationally renowned expert in gastrointestinal cancers. Robert Kerlan, MD, who has extensive clinical experience in the management of liver disease, including biliary disease, portal hypertension and hepatic malignancy and Robin K. (“Katie”) Kelley, MD, an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Young Investigator Award winner and Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium ASCO Foundation Merit Award; she has been designated as project lead.

 

Robin K. (“Katie”) Kelley, MD, had this to say regarding the project, “The creation of a tumor tissue bank specifically for hepatobiliary tumors significantly enhances our ability to find biomarkers to accurately diagnose patients with these debilitating diseases as well as to identify active new drugs in these notoriously treatment-refractory cancer types. This bank is providing the groundwork for the development of a broad range of future projects needed to find better treatments and biomarkers in the near future, and, of course we will be working hard to find a cure with this body of research in the long run.”

 

The incidence of hepatobiliary cancers is on the rise in the United States and is a huge cause for concern as these cancers are notoriously difficult to diagnose, resistant to standard therapies and underfunded..

The 2nd Annual Vincent Acquisto Memorial Golf Tournament- October 4, 2013

The 2nd Annual Vincent Acquisto Memorial Golf Tournament will be October 4, 2013 at Wente Vineyards in Livermore, California. Check back often for more details on the event as it approaches!

If you would like to be a part of this years tournament, download and fill out the registration form VAMGT Registration 2013.

VAMGT Flyer

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5 Fastest Moving Cancers Include Pancreatic and Liver!

In a recent article posted by Dr. Oz, he names Pancreatic cancer and Liver cancer as 2 of the 5 fastest moving cancers, both of which are part of the Hepatobiliary system.

 

Below is small excerpt from the Dr. Oz article:

Some cancers move slowly through your body, giving you time to catch them. But others move like a freight train – and wham. By the time you notice their warning signs, it’s too late.

How can you protect yourself against such deadly calamities? First, early detection is critical. Knowing exactly what your risks are will help guide early detection and arm you with the best solutions for prevention.

Start with this life-saving information on five of the fastest-moving cancers: pancreatic, brain, esophageal, liver and skin.

PANCREATIC CANCER: The Cancer You’re Most Likely to Miss
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest. Of the approximately 44,000 people diagnosed each year, 38,000 will die. Part of the problem with detection involves where the pancreas is located – hidden deep in the back of the abdomen. Too often, by the time the tumor is located, the cancer has spread beyond the initial site, making it more difficult to treat.

    • Warning Signs
    • Abdominal or back pain
    • Unexplained weight loss
    • Digestive problems
    • Light-colored stools
    • Jaundice
    • Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

Risk #1: Two or More Family Members Diagnosed With Pancreatic, Breast, Colon or Ovarian Cancer
Family history is an important risk factor since up to 10% of pancreatic cancers are inherited. Some genes associated with breast, colon and ovarian cancer, such as the BRCA2, may also put you at higher risk. If you have family members with a history of these diseases, particularly if they were diagnosed under the age of 50, consult your doctor, who may recommend seeing a genetic counselor.

Risk #2: Drinking More Than 1 Alcoholic Beverage a Day or More Than 2 Sodas Per Week
Chronic alcohol consumption – more than one drink a day for women and more than two drinks a day for men over an extended period of time – increases inflammation and can cause pancreatitis, which can lead to genetic damage of cells. Studies also show that people who drink two or more soft drinks per week also have an increased risk.

Risk #3: Type-2 Diabetes
Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not adequately produce or use insulin, a hormone normally made by the pancreas. Insulin helps the body utilize glucose (sugar), allowing glucose to enter cells and be used for energy. With diabetes, you see abnormal growth of insulin, which can lead to abnormal cell growth. Additionally, in people with diabetes, the glucose remains in the blood, resulting in high blood glucose levels, which can cause cell damage and long-term complications. Research shows that diabetes can either be a risk factor or symptom of pancreatic cancer. Most of the risk is found in people with type-2 diabetes; this type of diabetes most often starts in adulthood. If you have diabetes and you’re also at high risk for pancreatic cancer in terms of family history, inform your doctor who may want to do some blood or genetic testing.

Pancreatic Cancer Prevention Solutions

Solution #1: Reduce Fatty Red Meats and Processed Meats
Those who eat large amounts of red meat, processed meats and also meats cooked at a high temperature are believed to be more prone to pancreatic cancer. Reduce your intake of these foods high in saturated fat and nitrates.

Solution #2: Add 2 Servings of Red and Yellow Vegetables
As a general rule for cancer prevention, eat five servings of vegetables per day. Red and yellow vegetables – yams, tomatoes, squash, red and yellow peppers – are exceptional choices since they contain protective antioxidant-rich flavonoids and lycopene.

Solution #3: Curcumin (750mg/Twice a Day)
A naturally occurring substance found in turmeric, curcumin has been shown to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells and even prevent pancreatic cancer entirely in laboratory animals. New research shows that taking 750mg of this supplement daily can help stop the growth of pancreatic cancer.

LIVER CANCER: Could Your Favorite Foods Be Causing Liver Cancer?
Liver cancer rates as one of the scariest cancer diagnoses, with a dismal five-year patient survival rate of only 10%. Most patients don’t pick up on symptoms until liver cancer is in very late stages.

Warning Signs

    • Fatigue
    • Anemia
    • Upper abdomen or right shoulder pain
    • Jaundice
    • Unintended weight loss
    • Loss of appetite
    • Feeling very full after a small meal
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
Liver Cancer Risk Factors

Risk #1: Apple-shaped Body Type
Obesity in general is a major risk factor for liver cancer. An apple-shaped body marked by visceral fat – fatty tissue around the abdomen – is associated with risk factors such as diabetes and fatty liver disease. This type of obesity also causes metabolic syndrome that can lead to liver cancer and a host of other diseases. Avoid excess visceral fat by maintaining a waist size that measures half your height. See Solution #1.

Risk Factor #2: Chronic Alcohol Consumption
Excessive drinking on a regular basis can lead to cirrhosis. A liver plagued by cirrhosis creates a ticking bomb for liver cancer. As the liver tries to repair inflamed tissue by regenerating and repairing, a cancer-producing mutation can occur. If you are going to drink, choose red wine which contains antioxidants that can help reduce inflammation in the liver.

Liver Cancer Prevention Solutions

Solution #1: Eliminate Added Sugars
Food with added sugars increases your risk for developing obesity and diabetes, thus increasing your risk for fatty liver, cirrhosis and liver cancer. To keep your liver healthy, check ingredient labels for hidden sugars such as high fructose corn syrup.

Solution #2: Hepatitis B Vaccine
Chronic hepatitis is the most common cause of liver cancer. If you get tattooed, have unprotected sex or have blood transfusions, you can be exposed to hepatitis B. Today, children are vaccinated for hepatitis B, but if you are in your 40s, it’s very likely you have never received this vaccine. If you partake in high-risk behaviors, ask your doctor about being vaccinated. You can be screened for liver cancer with blood and ultrasound testing.

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The 1st Vince Acquisto Memorial Golf Tournament

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The Bili Project Official Launch Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sherna Stephenson

Mojo Marketing & Media

(818) 556 – 3842 [USA]

sherna@mojomarketingandmedia.com

thebiliprojectFOUNDATION_FINAL2

 

Bili Project Foundation Created to Research, Find Cure for Hepatobiliary Cancers – The Third Leading Cause of Cancer Deaths Worldwide

 

Initial Projects Include First Hepatobiliary Cancer Tissue Bank at USCF Medical Center

San Francisco (October 12, 2012) – Hepatobiliary cancers, those that affect the gallbladder, liver and bile ducts, are the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide based on a recent GLOBOCAN study.  But despite being some of the most lethal of cancers, they have received little notice outside of the medical community. The recently created, San Francisco-based The Bili Project Foundation is bringing this quick and silent killer into the spotlight and is committed to reducing the incidence and improve the treatment outcomes by promoting research to identify hepatobiliary cancer diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

 

The Foundation’s first initiative is creating an All-Star research team from the UCSF Medical Center to lead the creation of a longitudinal, annotated hepatobiliary cancer tissue bank and database to serve as the platform for a broad range of translational science in this complex, grim, and poorly-understood family of cancers. The team includes Alan P. Venook, MD, a nationally renowned expert in gastrointestinal cancers. Robert Kerlan, MD, who has extensive clinical experience in the management of liver disease, including biliary disease, portal hypertension and hepatic malignancy and Robin K. (“Katie”) Kelley, MD, an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Young Investigator Award winner and Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium ASCO Foundation Merit Award; she has been designated as project lead.

 

Robin K. (“Katie”) Kelley, MD, had this to say regarding the project, “The creation of a tumor tissue bank specifically for hepatobiliary tumors will significantly enhance our ability to find biomarkers to accurately diagnose patients with these debilitating diseases as well as to identify active new drugs in these notoriously treatment-refractory cancer types . This bank will provide the groundwork for the development of a broad range of future projects needed to find better treatments and biomarkers in the near future, and, of course we will be working hard to find a cure with this body of research in the long run.”

 

The Bili Project Foundation was established in the memory of Vince Acquisto, who recently succumbed to bile duct cancer. The foundation was created by Vince’s wife Sue Acquisto, and Vince’s business partner, Joy Stephenson.  “If screening or testing for risk factors or silent symptoms of this type of cancer was available for Vince, perhaps he would have had a chance for successful treatment at an early stage,” said Sue Acquisto. “It is my hope to educate others about risk factors and through the tumor bank, prevent this disease from suddenly taking the life of someone’s loved one.”

 

The incidence of hepatobiliary cancers is on the rise in the United States and is a huge cause for concern as these cancers are notoriously difficult to diagnose, resistant to standard therapies and underfunded.  For more information on hepatobiliary cancer and to donate or become a “Biliever”, please visit the foundation website www.thebiliproject.org.

 

About The Bili Project Foundation

The Bili Project Foundation’s mission is to reduce the incidence and improve the outcomes of hepatobiliary cancers by promoting research to identify diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in this complex and heterogeneous group of diseases.  Goals include plans to launch a new arm of gastrointestinal oncology research at UCSF by creating a tissue tumor bank to advance our understanding of detection, treatments and cures for hepatobiliary cancers.  Worldwide, they are the 3rd leading cause of cancer death based on GLOBOCON 2008 estimates and in the U.S., according to CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians (2009), hepatobiliary cancers are the 7th leading cause of cancer death.   The incidence of hepatobiliary cancers is on the rise in the United States.  Therefore, The Bili Project Foundation was created to promote and facilitate research into these diseases.  For more information on hepatobiliary cancer and how you can join in the fight and become a “Biliever”, please visit the foundation website www.biliprojectfoundation.org or call 1-855-277-BILI.

 

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Smallpox Vaccine Kills Liver Cancer

In the November 23rd issue of the San Francisco Chronicle, The Bili Project Foundation was mentioned as a key partner with the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center  in establishing a liver cancer tissue bank to collect samples for scientist worldwide.

 

Excerpt below:

Further complicating matters is that, since it’s so difficult to remove the tumors, scientists have a tough time harvesting useful samples of liver cancer cells for research. Just this month, UCSF announced that it is partnering with the Bili Project Foundation in San Francisco to open a liver cancer tissue bank to collect samples for scientists worldwide.

 

“Finding a new direction to approach this particularly challenging cancer type is critical,” said Dr. Robin Kate Kelly, a gastrointestinal cancer specialist at UCSF who is helping put together the tissue bank. “Our conventional strategies haven’t been nearly as successful with liver cancer.

Click here to read the full article on what is being done to advance research in the study of liver cancer..

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